Olive oil

From Efficiency Finder
Revision as of 12:03, 20 February 2013 by Breka (Talk | contribs) (Changed protection level for "Olive oil" (‎[edit=sysop] (indefinite) ‎[move=sysop] (indefinite)))

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Back to EFFICENCY FINDER OF FOOD INDUSTRY

Back to Information about fats & oils

Back to Products


1. GENERAL DESCRIPTION:


1. General Flowsheet of olive oil production

No information is available.


2. Description of techniques, methods and equipment
(BAT in the Food, Drink and Milk Industries, June 2005)

In traditional production of olive oil, olives are ground into a paste with stone mills, however these days modern milling equipment is also used. Milling is followed by mashing, possibly with the addition of salt. The pulp is then pressed and the press oil is clarified by sedimentation or centrifugation. Traditional open-cage presses are now being replaced by continuous screw expellers. The mashed pulp can also be separated in a horizontal decanter, in which case the crude oil is re-centrifugated after the addition of wash-water. Alternatively, machines can be used to remove the kernels from the pulp and the residue is then separated using self-discharging centrifuges. Cold pressing, which yields virgin grades, is generally followed by warm pressing at approximately 40oC. Cold-pressed olive oil is a valuable edible oil. In Spain, most installations use the two-phase type centrifuges, while in most other Mediterranean countries larger installations use the three-phase technique, and smaller installations typically still use the traditional pressing. Trade specifications are based primarily on the content of ffa and flavour assessment. In some countries, warm-pressed olive oil with a high acidity is refined by neutralization, bleaching and deodorization, and flavoured by blending with cold-pressed oil. The press cake contains 8-15% of a relatively dark oil, called sanza or orujo, which can be extracted with hexane and is used for technical purposes. After refining, it is also fit for edible consumption.

3. Temperature ranges and other parameters (table)
(BAT in the Food, Drink and Milk Industries, June 2005)


Temperature ranges-olive oil.jpg


4. Benchmark data

No information is available.


2. NEW TECHNOLOGIES:


a) Changes in the process: No information is available.

b) Changes in the energy distribution system: No information is available.

c) Changes in the heat supply system: No information is available.


Back to EFFICENCY FINDER OF FOOD INDUSTRY

Back to Information about fats & oils

Back to Products